Marketing Consultation and Brand Coaching

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23 Sep
2012

Reflection (part 2)

First of all this week, I would like to offer each of you the opportunity to share with me if you want me to continue to send discussion topics. He response rate has been low, as observed by those who have participated.

How to Get Your Voice Heard

The desire to gain or improve status can also be recognized in actions by people who want a greater voice in the activities of social, political, or other regulating organizations.

But recently, simple protest or marches don't seem to be enough for activists. We've seen the violent confrontations in China over the disputed Diaoyus territories with Japan, and here in Hong Kong, mass rallies and hunger strikes contributed to winning the day over the government's plans to National Education. This is of course a global trend as we witness the current deadly protests of the United States and France.

But is it going too far and over incidences too trivial? In Madrid, 60 people were hurt as music fans rioted when a filled-to-capacity venue hosting an MTV concert was closed to further entry. And in Amsterdam, youths vandalized shops set a car on fire, damaged lamp posts, and scores of injuries were reported, after they were denied admission to a private birthday party. The cause: about 30,000 people received an invitation to a girl's 16th birthday party after she announced the fete on Facebook and it went viral. She forgot to set her Facebook settings to private.

My inquiry to you, from an Asian perspective, is violent protest and rioting becoming the norm to making one's point of view heard? Have we lost the value of dialogue and compromise?

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5 Aug
2012

The shopper in China is changing according to those who follow customer behavior, further demonstrating that China is a dynamic market and continuing to evolve. Labeled 'Consumer 2.0,' they demonstrate that through experience and knowledge gained, the Chinese shopper is becoming more sophisticated.

Reported by Jing Daily.com, Chinese luxury shoppers are beginning to look for unknown brands over high-profile, recognized international labels. According to the trend tracker website, "There‘s a growing trend in China" a trend towards individualization: looking, being, and dressing differently from others. This is led by the second generation of Chinese shopper. They’re just starting out, but they’re larger, stronger and different from their predecessors. And incoming brands need to speak to them.” Other comments like, “China has moved from a country of collectivism to a country of individualism,” and “Today’s young people don’t want to blend in. They want freedom, at least in their appearance,” were included in the article.

In his recent book, What Chinese Want, Tom Doctoroff, North Asia CEO, J. Walter Thompson states that "While at the lower end of the luxury market, people do want that flashy . . . logo, but as you get more wealthy you need to project your power and wealthy in a more understated way." He predicts that luxury products that are more inconspicuous, with smaller, more subdued logos, will be the lasting ones, the brands that win.

Do you see evidence that shoppers here are becoming more thoughtful about the brands they buy, and how easy it is for others to identify their brand of choice?

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